Save yourself to save the planet.

11/04/2022

How a few good life choices can benefit yourself as well as the planet.

“The World Health Organization estimates that more than 13 million deaths around the world each year are due to avoidable environmental causes. This includes the climate crisis which is the single biggest health threat facing humanity. The climate crisis is also a health crisis.

Statement on World Health Day 2022 by the World Health Organization.

https://www.who.int/campaigns/world-health-day/2022

For the month of April we are focussing on how the climate crisis, as well as our social, economic and political choices influence the health of humanity as a whole.

It’s no secret that the planet is in trouble and that its due to our own doing.

The most obvious health risks, that also contribute to the climate crisis include air and water pollution.

According to the World Health Organization, air pollution kills approximately 7 million people globally, each year. Data indicates that almost all of the global population (99%) breathe air that exceeds the guideline limits for clean air set out by the WHO. Low- and middle-income countries suffer the most.

Smog from vehicles and industries, as well as indoor pollution from heating and cooking fires all contribute to millions of premature deaths every year. Poor air quality can result in increased mortality from stroke, heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer and acute respiratory infections.

Rivers – our lifeblood

More than 2 billion people live in areas at a high risk of water scarcity. Pollution from industries and agriculture has killed more than 80 percent of freshwater wildlife and it has caused the loss of more than a third of our wetlands.

Polluted water can be a breeding ground for dangerous bacteria and diseases including those responsible for diarrhoea, cholera, dysentery, typhoid, hepatitis A and polio. According to the UN nearly 300 000 children under five die annually from preventable diseases linked to unsafe water.

It is clear that the climate influences our health, but how does our lifestyles influence the planet?

Can we really have an impact on our world through what we eat and how we live?

The answer is simple: Yes – our life choices influence our environment, and we can ensure that those choices do as little harm as possible.

We have come up with an easy-to-follow guide that can help you make lifechanging “good life choices” that will benefit the planet on a daily basis.

Go organic: The health benefits of eating an unprocessed and organic diet cannot be denied. But the upside of eating less processed and packaged food, as well as cutting down on food grown with the use of pesticides and chemicals, is that it will cut down on water pollution from industrial farming. Thus preserving rivers and wetlands for future generations.

Cut down on food waste: It’s estimated that up to 14 percent of all food purchased is never consumed by the household that bought it and ends up in landfills as food waste.

This leads to methane gas being released as part of the decomposition process. By buying food sparingly and using it to cook nutritious meals instead of opting for fast food, you can save money and significantly reduce your household food waste.

Industrial farming and meat production: Upping your intake of vegetables is a tried and tested health tip – eating sufficient amounts of unprocessed fruit and vegetables can help maintain a healthy weight and cut down your risk of various diseases and cancers.

If you take one step further and decrease the amount of red meat that you eat weekly, your good life choice will have a significant impact on the health of the planet as well.

The large-scale production of meat required to satiate the appetites of the world are a major contributor to methane gas released into the atmosphere. Methane is a dangerous and plentiful greenhouse gas, directly leading to global warming.

By skipping meat a couple of days a week and growing (at least some of) your own vegetables, you can greatly reduce your households carbon food-print.

Count your steps: This doesn’t just mean you should be trying to take at least 10 000 steps a day. (But do that in any case!) We are talking about the steps your food goes through between the farm and your plate.

Think about the environmental cost of a frozen meal compared to a meal made from scratch. The frozen meal is processed and made in a factory using electricity, packaged in plastic and paper, frozen and then transported in a refrigerated truck to wherever you buy it.

Compared to a plant-based meal made (even just partially) from homegrown ingredients, there is a massive difference in environmental impact. And nutritional value.

By making these changes you will not only be on the road to a healthier life, but you will be helping to combat the climate crisis – securing a better future for all!

Save yourself to save the planet.

11/04/2022

How a few good life choices can benefit yourself as well as the planet.

“The World Health Organization estimates that more than 13 million deaths around the world each year are due to avoidable environmental causes. This includes the climate crisis which is the single biggest health threat facing humanity. The climate crisis is also a health crisis.

Statement on World Health Day 2022 by the World Health Organization.

https://www.who.int/campaigns/world-health-day/2022

For the month of April we are focussing on how the climate crisis, as well as our social, economic and political choices influence the health of humanity as a whole.

It’s no secret that the planet is in trouble and that its due to our own doing.

The most obvious health risks, that also contribute to the climate crisis include air and water pollution.

According to the World Health Organization, air pollution kills approximately 7 million people globally, each year. Data indicates that almost all of the global population (99%) breathe air that exceeds the guideline limits for clean air set out by the WHO. Low- and middle-income countries suffer the most.

Smog from vehicles and industries, as well as indoor pollution from heating and cooking fires all contribute to millions of premature deaths every year. Poor air quality can result in increased mortality from stroke, heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer and acute respiratory infections.

Rivers – our lifeblood

More than 2 billion people live in areas at a high risk of water scarcity. Pollution from industries and agriculture has killed more than 80 percent of freshwater wildlife and it has caused the loss of more than a third of our wetlands.

Polluted water can be a breeding ground for dangerous bacteria and diseases including those responsible for diarrhoea, cholera, dysentery, typhoid, hepatitis A and polio. According to the UN nearly 300 000 children under five die annually from preventable diseases linked to unsafe water.

It is clear that the climate influences our health, but how does our lifestyles influence the planet?

Can we really have an impact on our world through what we eat and how we live?

The answer is simple: Yes – our life choices influence our environment, and we can ensure that those choices do as little harm as possible.

We have come up with an easy-to-follow guide that can help you make lifechanging “good life choices” that will benefit the planet on a daily basis.

Go organic: The health benefits of eating an unprocessed and organic diet cannot be denied. But the upside of eating less processed and packaged food, as well as cutting down on food grown with the use of pesticides and chemicals, is that it will cut down on water pollution from industrial farming. Thus preserving rivers and wetlands for future generations.

Cut down on food waste: It’s estimated that up to 14 percent of all food purchased is never consumed by the household that bought it and ends up in landfills as food waste.

This leads to methane gas being released as part of the decomposition process. By buying food sparingly and using it to cook nutritious meals instead of opting for fast food, you can save money and significantly reduce your household food waste.

Industrial farming and meat production: Upping your intake of vegetables is a tried and tested health tip – eating sufficient amounts of unprocessed fruit and vegetables can help maintain a healthy weight and cut down your risk of various diseases and cancers.

If you take one step further and decrease the amount of red meat that you eat weekly, your good life choice will have a significant impact on the health of the planet as well.

The large-scale production of meat required to satiate the appetites of the world are a major contributor to methane gas released into the atmosphere. Methane is a dangerous and plentiful greenhouse gas, directly leading to global warming.

By skipping meat a couple of days a week and growing (at least some of) your own vegetables, you can greatly reduce your households carbon food-print.

Count your steps: This doesn’t just mean you should be trying to take at least 10 000 steps a day. (But do that in any case!) We are talking about the steps your food goes through between the farm and your plate.

Think about the environmental cost of a frozen meal compared to a meal made from scratch. The frozen meal is processed and made in a factory using electricity, packaged in plastic and paper, frozen and then transported in a refrigerated truck to wherever you buy it.

Compared to a plant-based meal made (even just partially) from homegrown ingredients, there is a massive difference in environmental impact. And nutritional value.

By making these changes you will not only be on the road to a healthier life, but you will be helping to combat the climate crisis – securing a better future for all!